Great Ocean Road – Australian National Heritage

 

Great Ocean Road is the 243 kilometres stretch of road along the south-eastern coast of Australia. This is one of the most spectacular coastal roads n the world.  Long time ago, while still in Ukraine, I watched a documentary about this road and Twelve Apostles. Then and there I decided to visit that place.

Many years and visits later I still believe it’s the most spectacular place in Victoria. So when my friend Sangeeta came to visit me in Australia, I had no doubts about where to take her for sightseeing.

 

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The Great Ocean Road was built by workers in 1919-1932 and dedicated to the soldiers, who died during the World War 1.

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This winding road follows the coast starting from Torquay, where many people come for surfing.

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We stayed our first night in Port Campbell. This is a quiet country town with population of only 600 people. It swells three times during holidays and long weekends as this place is the closest to Twelve Apostols.  Near Information Centre we found an old anchor from one of the shipwrecks.

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Helicopter flights  are great tourist attraction in this area. It’s quite expensive ($145 per 15 minutes flight, $235 for 25 minutes and $45 video).  Tiny cute helicopters can take 7 people and a pilot.

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The birdview of the coastline is beyond spectacular.

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Some limestone stack formations have already collapsed due to the wind and water damage, but some stay strong and proud.

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It was a bit windy on the day and the photos from the window are not very sharp.

 

 

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No wonder that more than 200 ships with people and cargo found their tragic end near those rocks.

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Gibsons Steps from the air. This is the only way to get to the sandy stretch of the beach. Here the very famous ship Lock Ard crashed into the reef and sank in 15 minutes, taking all the passengers except a young girl and one sailor.

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After we succsessfully finished our helicopter tour it’s time to take photos.

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When this area was discovered in 18-th century there were 12 large formations, therefore and Biblical name Twelve Apostles. But  harsh southern winds and storms kept damaging limestone and they collapse one after another. When we arrived to Australia there were only 9 left. Now it’s seven. But they are beautiful as ever.

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This place is called Buns in the Oven. Two large rocks on the right in the cave which shaped like a traditional oven – great name, straight to the point.

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This is the Thunder Cave.

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Through this narrow opening the ships had to squeeze to get to the shore. It’s difficult even in calm weather and basically impossible during the storms and heavy fogs. And under the surface there are reefs and strong currents. No wonder so many ships crashed here.

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I think this place is called Two Sisters.

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The narrow long formation in the middle called the Rasorback at Loch Ard Gorge.

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The weather was getting worse by the minute.  Apparently locals called it “perfect shipwreck weather”.

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But nothing can stop Sangeeta and me when we are on the mission. Wind, rain, cold – no problems…

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We basically did not see any sun during the trip, which is not fair. I wanted to show my guest the most beautiful coastline. But I am sure she will find it hard to forget not only because it’s stunning, not because of my great company, but also because we found this lonely Jucy van with fantastic slogan.

From now on it will become our new motto.

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