Indian trucks – art galleries on wheels

On my first time arriving in India I was totally shocked by the noise, the smell and the colours. These three elements were tightly intertwined in my mind.  Nothing else had ever penetrated my senses deep enough to leave a mark. Even so, if I saw a few vehicles being decorated all over I did not pay much attention. My friend’s wedding was the highlight and focus of my first trip.

Later, when my friend and I went on our journey to Rajasthan next year, we spent lots and lots time on the road. This is when I noticed that there is a special art form in India – truck decoration. They are mainly painting and slogans, and very creative ones sometimes. (How about No Wife -No Life.) Some of them resemble graffiti. But I think it’s better to show these “masterpieces on wheels” than trying to describe the indescribable.

Here’s to the trucks of India and their drivers.

 

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Horn Please – the most common slogan. I actually can’t remember seeing many trucks without it.

 

 

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Horn Please is more important than number plates, which are hidden somewhere in the corner.

 

 

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I was asking what a Preet was, but it happened to be just a surname. I thought it would be something sophisticated like, for example, Love Rules The World.

 

 

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This driver chose to decorate his truck with old advertisement boards. And lots of Pom-poms and scarves.

 

 

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Lucky is the drivers name. More scarves, which turn into rugs very quickly.

 

 

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Look at these metal discs and bells in large numbers hanging off the strings. They suppose to deter bad luck.

 

 

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Someone is very fond of tranquil beaches and palm resorts. The meaning of Wait Side is a total mystery .

 

 

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Trucks are ALWAYS overloaded, to the point that they tilt on the corners and turn over. I can’t count how many accidents we saw due to overloading.

 

 

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This driver is very patriotic: on top of compulsory Horn Please he also has two Indian flags.

 

 

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I am pretty sure there is some outstanding pictures on the back. Unfortunately, it’s covered by a tarp. But there is no doubt that this is an Indian vehicle. If you have any – check the bumper.

 

 

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Surprisingly, pictures of cows are not very common.

 

 

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Another cow with pom-poms. And on the right is a front of another truck. And more Pom-poms.

 

 

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This truck is like an Art Gallery on wheels. Very colourful and cheerful!

 

 

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This truck belongs to Agarwal Movers Group. I suspect their business does not flourish, as there no money left for traditional scarves, pom-poms and other striking decorations.

 

 

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It’s not only long vehicle as stated on the back, but it’s also very tall. What means Stop Signal I have no idea.

 

 

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Use Dipper At Night – it’s quite a reasonable request. This truck can carry loads all over India. There is some dangerous liquid in the tanker. And the pretty bird is overlooking the delivery.

 

 

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This tanker carries some dangerous liquids – Class 3. However, this sign is very obscure because all other bright segments take your attention away.

 

 

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So, is it Edible Oil or Liver Box? And what is Liver Box?

 

 

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Who knows why edible oils are classified like dangerous goods?

 

 

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I really really love this one. Skull and the bones speak for themselves. No, scream for themselves. DANGER!

 

 

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Safety Begins At Home! There is probably some connection with LPG tanker, but it eluded me. Maybe, the Indian women need to exercise extreme caution while cooking with gas? Otherwise the end is quite predictable -skull and bones.

 

 

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X-mas tinsels compensate for the lack of imagination.

 

 

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We were driving behind this bread truck for a while and I was wondering what it is to do with Maruti. Maruti is a Japanese car manufacturer, which is branded as Suzuki in Australia. But bread? My friend explained to me that Maruti means monkey in Hindi. Then I was even more puzzled: why is a car manufacturer is called Monkey? Something to do with “Monkey business”?

 

 

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We can only guess what is there under those huge bags? Is there a truck, a motorbike or an autorickshaw? I will leave it to your imagination.

 

 

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Just a little insight how trucks look from the side. Very pretty I would say. With flowers, decorated wheels and a welcome sign.

 

 

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As well as flowers, pom-poms and scarves. Happy Wife -Happy Life?

 

 

This photo belongs to Royal Mysore Walks. A bullock cart painter at work. Ganjam, a village in srirangapatna is famous for its custom made carts in India! #royalmysorewalks #india #mysore #srirangapatna #walkingtour #indiatravel #explore #karnataka
Nothing is set amiss. Even bullock carts have to be spectacular.
A bullock cart painter at work. Ganjam, a village in Srirangapatna is famous for its custom made carts in India! This photo belongs to Royal Mysore Walks.

 

There is a huge business of decorating vehicles in India. Especially it’s well developed in Rajastan and Gujarat. Along the highways there are many small shops and stalls which sell all those decorations. They are very colourful and can satisfy any taste. Even mine. I bought myself two pom-poms on the ropes, which drivers usually hang on the side mirrors. It took me a long time to decide on a fierce colour combination. Finally I chose the most outrageous turquoise and eye-popping pink, both with  hair clips with pearls and rhinestones in the middle. Now I have them on my front door. So it’s pretty obvious who is obsessed with India in Australia.

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